California Vacation Part 6

We spent part of an afternoon shopping up and down the Haight/Ashbury area which apparently is popular to some. Our relatives who live close by called it “The Haight” (pronounced like “hate”).

Large vintage record store
Alley off of Haight St.

It was in this area out of all of San Francisco that I saw the most number of homeless people.

After The Haight we went to Balmy alley to check out the art murals which apparently change from time to time.

More sites around the Balmy alley area. My husband thought it was the ‘mission district” but I don’t know.

We also just kind of drove around San Francisco checking out all the architecture of the houses crammed together on the hills of the city. Some of the hills were so steep you couldn’t even see over the top of where the street went. It was like going over a cliff 😂.

We also drove by the Full House house!

Full House house

California Vacation Part 1

California Vacation Part 2

California Vacation Part 3

California Vacation Part 4

California Vacation Part 5

Abandoned Structure

I can’t tell if this is a house, a shack, a shed, a garage or what. It is old and tucked back in the brush half hidden from view.

Pixel 3a XL/ Snapseed

Zumwalt’s Fort

Last month, I posted a video of an edit I did of an old cabin. Below are some more images of that cabin, which is located in Fort Zumwalt Park in O’Fallon, Missouri. Read further down for the complete history of the building.

“It’s hard to imagine the O’Fallon area as the leading edge of the American frontier. But in 1799, when Daniel Boone and his family settled just a few miles away, the area was a wilderness in which Native Americans hunted, fished and trapped game.

At about the same time that Daniel Boone arrived, Jacob Zumwalt and his extended family settled in the O’Fallon area circa 1798, building a large log home. A few years later, when the War of 1812 set off deadly guerilla raids with Native Americans ambushing and killing American settlers, local families fled to the shelter provided by the Zumwalt’s home, which is said to have been fortified with a stockade fence.  A spring, which is now Lake Whetsel, supplied water.

Zumwalt’s Fort, as the fortified house came to be called, was one of 35-plus “settler forts” that once stood in Missouri. Boone’s Fort at present-day Matson, Missouri, was the largest.

The reconstructed Zumwalt’s Fort opened in 2015 as a gift to the City from the O’Fallon Community Foundation. It is the only rebuilt War of 1812 settler fort in the state.” https://www.ofallon.mo.us/zumwalts-fort

The last seven tree posts that I’ve posted are from within this Fort Zumwalt Park and they include glimpses of Lake Whetsel. I have about 4 more images still to come in this series.

Sony A68/Capture One

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